Country Music Hall of Fame member Harold Bradley died this morning (1/31) at age 93.

01/02/2019

» Chronicle: As reported earlier in Breaking News, Country Music Hall of Fame member Harold Bradley died this morning (1/31) at age 93. Along with his late brother Owen Bradley, the two are responsible for helping create the "Nashville Sound," which incorporated strings and other pop-leaning production elements into country music. The brothers opened Bradley Film and Recording on Sixteenth Avenue South in 1955 and soon after, opened a second studio using a military Quonset hut (later purchased by Columbia Records). Bradley played electric bass on Patsy Cline's "Crazy" and the banjo on Johnny Horton's "The Battle of New Orleans." As a rhythm guitarist, he played on thousands of recordings, including Brenda Lee's "I'm Sorry," Roger Miller's "King of the Road," Jeannie C. Riley's "Harper Valley P.T.A.," Bobby Vinton's "Blue Velvet," Burl Ives' "Holly Jolly Christmas," Tammy Wynette's "Stand by Your Man" and Conway Twitty's "Hello Darlin'."

Bradley was the first president of Nashville's chapter of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS). In 1991 he became president of Nashville's chapter of the American Federation of Musicians (AF of M), later becoming its international VP. Bradley was inducted into the CMHoF in 2006. More on Bradley's career here. Funeral arrangements are pending.

"For decades, Harold Bradley went to work doing something that he called 'playing,'" said CMHoF CEO Kyle Young. "He surveyed every sonic situation and determined what he could do to make things better, more melodic and more harmonious. There are lessons in Harold's approach to playing that go far beyond music. He lived his life with kindness, gentility and discretion. On hopeful days, I will try to view Harold Bradley as an inspiration and not an aberration."

"Harold Bradley's legacy can be found in much of our Country Music history," said CMA CEO Sarah Trahern. "His musicianship throughout the decades can be heard just about everywhere, and his dedication to preserving Music City will live on for generations to come. We're grateful for all that he's done for Country Music and our industry."

 

» Chronicle: As reported earlier in Breaking News, Country Music Hall of Fame member Harold Bradley died this morning (1/31) at age 93. Along with his late brother Owen Bradley, the two are responsible for helping create the "Nashville Sound," which incorporated strings and other pop-leaning production elements into country music. The brothers opened Bradley Film and Recording on Sixteenth Avenue South in 1955 and soon after, opened a second studio using a military Quonset hut (later purchased by Columbia Records). Bradley played electric bass on Patsy Cline's "Crazy" and the banjo on Johnny Horton's "The Battle of New Orleans." As a rhythm guitarist, he played on thousands of recordings, including Brenda Lee's "I'm Sorry," Roger Miller's "King of the Road," Jeannie C. Riley's "Harper Valley P.T.A.," Bobby Vinton's "Blue Velvet," Burl Ives' "Holly Jolly Christmas," Tammy Wynette's "Stand by Your Man" and Conway Twitty's "Hello Darlin'."

Bradley was the first president of Nashville's chapter of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS). In 1991 he became president of Nashville's chapter of the American Federation of Musicians (AF of M), later becoming its international VP. Bradley was inducted into the CMHoF in 2006. More on Bradley's career here. Funeral arrangements are pending.

"For decades, Harold Bradley went to work doing something that he called 'playing,'" said CMHoF CEO Kyle Young. "He surveyed every sonic situation and determined what he could do to make things better, more melodic and more harmonious. There are lessons in Harold's approach to playing that go far beyond music. He lived his life with kindness, gentility and discretion. On hopeful days, I will try to view Harold Bradley as an inspiration and not an aberration."

"Harold Bradley's legacy can be found in much of our Country Music history," said CMA CEO Sarah Trahern. "His musicianship throughout the decades can be heard just about everywhere, and his dedication to preserving Music City will live on for generations to come. We're grateful for all that he's done for Country Music and our industry."

 

» Chronicle: As reported earlier in Breaking News, Country Music Hall of Fame member Harold Bradley died this morning (1/31) at age 93. Along with his late brother Owen Bradley, the two are responsible for helping create the "Nashville Sound," which incorporated strings and other pop-leaning production elements into country music. The brothers opened Bradley Film and Recording on Sixteenth Avenue South in 1955 and soon after, opened a second studio using a military Quonset hut (later purchased by Columbia Records). Bradley played electric bass on Patsy Cline's "Crazy" and the banjo on Johnny Horton's "The Battle of New Orleans." As a rhythm guitarist, he played on thousands of recordings, including Brenda Lee's "I'm Sorry," Roger Miller's "King of the Road," Jeannie C. Riley's "Harper Valley P.T.A.," Bobby Vinton's "Blue Velvet," Burl Ives' "Holly Jolly Christmas," Tammy Wynette's "Stand by Your Man" and Conway Twitty's "Hello Darlin'."

Bradley was the first president of Nashville's chapter of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS). In 1991 he became president of Nashville's chapter of the American Federation of Musicians (AF of M), later becoming its international VP. Bradley was inducted into the CMHoF in 2006. More on Bradley's career here. Funeral arrangements are pending.

"For decades, Harold Bradley went to work doing something that he called 'playing,'" said CMHoF CEO Kyle Young. "He surveyed every sonic situation and determined what he could do to make things better, more melodic and more harmonious. There are lessons in Harold's approach to playing that go far beyond music. He lived his life with kindness, gentility and discretion. On hopeful days, I will try to view Harold Bradley as an inspiration and not an aberration."

"Harold Bradley's legacy can be found in much of our Country Music history," said CMA CEO Sarah Trahern. "His musicianship throughout the decades can be heard just about everywhere, and his dedication to preserving Music City will live on for generations to come. We're grateful for all that he's done for Country Music and our industry."

 

» Chronicle: As reported earlier in Breaking News, Country Music Hall of Fame member Harold Bradley died this morning (1/31) at age 93. Along with his late brother Owen Bradley, the two are responsible for helping create the "Nashville Sound," which incorporated strings and other pop-leaning production elements into country music. The brothers opened Bradley Film and Recording on Sixteenth Avenue South in 1955 and soon after, opened a second studio using a military Quonset hut (later purchased by Columbia Records). Bradley played electric bass on Patsy Cline's "Crazy" and the banjo on Johnny Horton's "The Battle of New Orleans." As a rhythm guitarist, he played on thousands of recordings, including Brenda Lee's "I'm Sorry," Roger Miller's "King of the Road," Jeannie C. Riley's "Harper Valley P.T.A.," Bobby Vinton's "Blue Velvet," Burl Ives' "Holly Jolly Christmas," Tammy Wynette's "Stand by Your Man" and Conway Twitty's "Hello Darlin'."

Bradley was the first president of Nashville's chapter of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS). In 1991 he became president of Nashville's chapter of the American Federation of Musicians (AF of M), later becoming its international VP. Bradley was inducted into the CMHoF in 2006. More on Bradley's career here. Funeral arrangements are pending.

"For decades, Harold Bradley went to work doing something that he called 'playing,'" said CMHoF CEO Kyle Young. "He surveyed every sonic situation and determined what he could do to make things better, more melodic and more harmonious. There are lessons in Harold's approach to playing that go far beyond music. He lived his life with kindness, gentility and discretion. On hopeful days, I will try to view Harold Bradley as an inspiration and not an aberration."

"Harold Bradley's legacy can be found in much of our Country Music history," said CMA CEO Sarah Trahern. "His musicianship throughout the decades can be heard just about everywhere, and his dedication to preserving Music City will live on for generations to come. We're grateful for all that he's done for Country Music and our industry."

 


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